Array
(
    [0] => WP_Query Object
        (
            [query] => Array
                (
                    [is-categories] => south-of-england-area/south-east
                )

            [query_vars] => Array
                (
                    [is-categories] => south-east
                    [error] => 
                    [m] => 
                    [p] => 0
                    [post_parent] => 
                    [subpost] => 
                    [subpost_id] => 
                    [attachment] => 
                    [attachment_id] => 0
                    [name] => 
                    [pagename] => 
                    [page_id] => 0
                    [second] => 
                    [minute] => 
                    [hour] => 
                    [day] => 0
                    [monthnum] => 0
                    [year] => 0
                    [w] => 0
                    [category_name] => 
                    [tag] => 
                    [cat] => 
                    [tag_id] => 
                    [author] => 
                    [author_name] => 
                    [feed] => 
                    [tb] => 
                    [paged] => 0
                    [meta_key] => 
                    [meta_value] => 
                    [preview] => 
                    [s] => 
                    [sentence] => 
                    [title] => 
                    [fields] => 
                    [menu_order] => 
                    [embed] => 
                    [category__in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [category__not_in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [category__and] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [post__in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [post__not_in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [post_name__in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [tag__in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [tag__not_in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [tag__and] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [tag_slug__in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [tag_slug__and] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [post_parent__in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [post_parent__not_in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [author__in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [author__not_in] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [ignore_sticky_posts] => 
                    [suppress_filters] => 
                    [cache_results] => 1
                    [update_post_term_cache] => 1
                    [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1
                    [update_post_meta_cache] => 1
                    [post_type] => 
                    [posts_per_page] => 5
                    [nopaging] => 
                    [comments_per_page] => 50
                    [no_found_rows] => 
                    [taxonomy] => is-categories
                    [term] => south-east
                    [order] => DESC
                )

            [tax_query] => WP_Tax_Query Object
                (
                    [queries] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => Array
                                (
                                    [taxonomy] => is-categories
                                    [terms] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => south-east
                                        )

                                    [field] => slug
                                    [operator] => IN
                                    [include_children] => 1
                                )

                        )

                    [relation] => AND
                    [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                        (
                            [0] => whpvu_term_relationships
                        )

                    [queried_terms] => Array
                        (
                            [is-categories] => Array
                                (
                                    [terms] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => south-east
                                        )

                                    [field] => slug
                                )

                        )

                    [primary_table] => whpvu_posts
                    [primary_id_column] => ID
                )

            [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object
                (
                    [queries] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [relation] => 
                    [meta_table] => 
                    [meta_id_column] => 
                    [primary_table] => 
                    [primary_id_column] => 
                    [table_aliases:protected] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [clauses:protected] => Array
                        (
                        )

                    [has_or_relation:protected] => 
                )

            [date_query] => 
            [queried_object] => WP_Term Object
                (
                    [term_id] => 38
                    [name] => South East
                    [slug] => south-east
                    [term_group] => 0
                    [term_taxonomy_id] => 41
                    [taxonomy] => is-categories
                    [description] => 
                    [parent] => 25
                    [count] => 8
                    [filter] => raw
                )

            [queried_object_id] => 38
            [request] => SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS  whpvu_posts.ID FROM whpvu_posts  LEFT JOIN whpvu_term_relationships ON (whpvu_posts.ID = whpvu_term_relationships.object_id) WHERE 1=1  AND ( 
  whpvu_term_relationships.term_taxonomy_id IN (41)
) AND whpvu_posts.post_type = 'improvement-science' AND (whpvu_posts.post_status = 'publish') GROUP BY whpvu_posts.ID ORDER BY whpvu_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 5
            [posts] => Array
                (
                    [0] => WP_Post Object
                        (
                            [ID] => 3434
                            [post_author] => 8
                            [post_date] => 2013-01-16 16:51:31
                            [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-16 16:51:31
                            [post_content] => 

The journey -

The project aimed to reduce inpatient falls across eight elderly care and acute medical wards. Nationally over 200,000 falls are reported each year in the NHS and are a major issue in a range of health and social care settings, both NHS and non-NHS. The initiative has focussed on what happens to patients for the first few days in hospital. With an increasing national focus on dementia and frailty the team believes that reducing falls will become a major challenge in delivering compassionate care.  The cost of failing to address the issue in terms of cost and reputation is an additional driver.

 

Outcomes

In the eight wards covered by the initial phase, falls were reduced by 32{79f878acaa41f375dcd804cc8c058b5459a5482f20a3b9f87269b26c8734749b} in twelve months.  Following this success a trust-wide initiative replicated the activity, achieving a reduction across the trust of 17{79f878acaa41f375dcd804cc8c058b5459a5482f20a3b9f87269b26c8734749b}. The original eight wards, with minimal additional input, are still improving at a faster rate than the rest of the trust and have reduced their rate by a further 31{79f878acaa41f375dcd804cc8c058b5459a5482f20a3b9f87269b26c8734749b}.  These results indicate that a focus on the behaviour and habits of individual practitioners is the way to make change sustainable and continuous. In 2012 the trust was shortlisted for the BMJ Safety /Improvement Award.  

Patient setting

In-patient   X Out-patient Community based
Mental health Chronic illness Cross-systems
 

Clinical area

Staying healthy Maternity and newborn Children and young people Acute care   X
Planned care Mental health Long-term conditions End of life
 

Information, tools and techniques used

The first phase, which took a conventional approach to service improvement (training, action plans, guidelines, meetings etc) was abandoned after 9 months as no improvements had been made.  Phase 2 focussed on the concepts of emergent design, followership and imitation, producing outstanding results. Over the past 3 years the team has moved from a position of thinking that safety is a product of resilient processes to thinking that safety is something that emerges out of imitating safe behaviours.  

Geography

Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust.  

Timescale

Phase 1 started in June 2009 and the project is still ongoing.  

Contact details and further information

Mark Renshaw, Deputy Chief of Safety, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust: Mark.Renshaw@bsuh.nhs.uk

Paula Tucker, Head of Nursing Patient Safety, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust: Paula.tucker@bsuh.nhs.uk

[post_title] => Reducing falls in elderly care and across the hospital [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => reducing-falls-in-elderly-care-and-across-the-hospital [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-24 13:27:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-24 13:27:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://clients.electricstudio.co.uk/tvhiec/wpcms/?post_type=improvement-science&p=3434 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => improvement-science [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3430 [post_author] => 8 [post_date] => 2013-01-16 16:37:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-16 16:37:16 [post_content] =>

The journey -

The purpose of the programme is to improve patient flows, making emergency pathways more efficient and reducing length of stay and number of beds whilst also making care safe, effective and a good experience for patients and staff. By better matching capacity to demand the trust aimed to make sure that patients who didn’t need to be admitted to the hospital could be managed on an ambulatory pathway or a short stay pathway; and that inpatients were swiftly signposted to the right specialty with a clinical management plan and pathway of care that would facilitate an appropriate length of stay.

Outcomes

Key achievements of the Programme include: Rapid Assessment in place in A&E where feasible; average length of stay reduced by 0.6 days; a 28 per cent decrease in length of stay over 14 days; 5 pathways embedded in ambulatory and short stay with another 7 at various stages of roll out; 45 patients case managed at home through a ‘virtual ward’ at any one time; a 3 per cent increase in discharges taking place before 2pm; and monthly levels of patients being seen and treated within four hours at 97 per cent.

Patient setting

In-patient           X Out-patient Community based
Mental health Chronic illness Cross-systems       X
 

Clinical area

Staying healthy Maternity and newborn Children and young people Acute care        X
Planned care Mental health Long-term conditions End of life
 

Information, tools and techniques used

Several change management tools and models have been used, most notably some principles of PRINCE2 methodology and a Sarah Fraser model for sustainability.  Lean methodology has also informed the programme and a performance dashboard was developed according to IST specifications. The Emergency Care Programme has also benefited from clear communication strategies within divisions and large-scale direct engagement with staff.

 

Geography

This programme took place in the three main acute sites of East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust: Kent and Canterbury Hospital (Canterbury); William Harvey Hospital (Ashford); and the Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Hospital (Margate).  

Timescale

The programme started in June 2010.  For the first 18 months, the programme focused primarily on developing the right systems and processes, identifying clinical leaders to facilitate the change and engaging staff.  It is now being refreshed to recognise current achievements and look ahead at the challenges that remain. With systems and processes in place, greater focus is being placed on the cultural aspects of embedding change in the organisation.  

Contact details and further information

Karen Miles, Associate Director of Operations, East Kent Hospitals University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust: kmiles1@nhs.net [post_title] => Emergency Care Quality Improvement Programme [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => emergency-care-quality-improvement-programme [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-24 13:27:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-24 13:27:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://clients.electricstudio.co.uk/tvhiec/wpcms/?post_type=improvement-science&p=3430 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => improvement-science [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3414 [post_author] => 8 [post_date] => 2013-01-16 15:27:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-16 15:27:53 [post_content] =>

The journey -

Safe, Supportive and Therapeutic Care aimed to improve safety and care within acute inpatient mental health units; to minimise risk while maximising therapeutic benefit. A secondary but related objective was to reduce length of stay in acute inpatient units. Strands of work covered three key areas: clinical skills and interventions; policies, procedures and systems; and environmental security. Specific activities included a thorough review of clinical evidence and of policy and procedures; staff training and a ligature audit to identify and remove any environmental elements contributing to increased risk of patient suicide.  

Outcomes

The programme has achieved a wide range of improvements, including better clinical risk assessment and collaborative and patient focused care plans. Each acute inpatient environment has been assessed using an accredited ligature audit tool with high risk ligature points being addressed first and processes identified to modify medium and low risk points. The programme has created a stronger identity and culture within Acute Care, as well as greater clarity among the different professions (psychology, nursing, occupational therapy and medical) about their role and contribution to providing high quality care.  There is now greater consistency of care across acute units and the programme has also achieved its overarching aim, which was to minimise risk while maximising the therapeutic benefit of inpatient care.  

Patient setting

In-patienta Out-patient Community based
Mental health   X Chronic illness Cross-systems
 

Clinical area

Staying healthy Maternity and newborn Children and young people Acute care   X
Planned care Mental health   X Long-term conditions End of life
 

Information, tools and techniques used

Whilst some general principles of change management underpinned the programme, it did not follow a formal change model. Different change management processes included a ligature audit which used a validated tool to assess environments as well as consulting nationally in order to learn from good practice elsewhere. The review of risk policy, training and redesign of risk tools was informed by a full consultation within the trust.  

Geography

The programme was run across the six acute inpatient units and six crisis teams working in the community across the Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.  

Timescale

The programme was initiated in March 2010, and by April 2012 most of its key elements had been implemented.  

Contact details and further information

Theresa Dorey, Nurse Consultant/Professional Lead, Acute Care.

theresa.Dorey@sussexpartnership. nhs.uk

[post_title] => Safe, Supportive and Therapeutic Care [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => safe-supportive-and-therapeutic-care [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-01-16 15:47:17 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-01-16 15:47:17 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://clients.electricstudio.co.uk/tvhiec/wpcms/?post_type=improvement-science&p=3414 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => improvement-science [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3412 [post_author] => 8 [post_date] => 2013-01-16 15:21:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-16 15:21:54 [post_content] =>

The journey -

The aim of the Normalising Birth programme was to address the clinical variation in deliveries across the 11 acute trusts in the South East Coast region. It was important in the early stages to develop a clear understanding of why the variation in birth intervention (primarily Caesarean sections) existed, and to identify those units who were performing well. From here, best practice could be spread. Care providers have been pressurised to respond to data on Caesarean rates by lowering them, however, this data was regarded by the project manager as a somewhat blunt indicator of the quality of maternity care. The vision was to explore this clinical variation in more meaningful ‘sub-groups’. A detailed exploration was seen as a potentially powerful tool for initiating change and improvement across the region.  

Outcomes

A significant achievement of the programme is a unique dataset which now exists, illustrating the regional clinical variation in intervention, at a more meaningful level of detail. Trusts are now able to look at their own performance in direct comparison to that of other trusts, something which has provided additional clarity in analysing their own performance and working culture. The development and use of this data has been instrumental in helping trusts to learn collaboratively and share best practice, for example in supporting or advising other units facing similar challenges. A further achievement has been the increase in enthusiasm for new, larger projects arising from the collaborative nature of the programme and resulting increase in confidence created through the group process.  

Patient setting

In-patient   X Out-patient Community based
Mental health Chronic illness Cross-systems
 

Clinical area

Staying healthy Maternity and newborn X Children and young people Acute care
Planned care   X Mental health Long-term conditions End of life
 

Information, tools and techniques used

No specific change model was followed, although elements of the PDSA (Plan, Do, Study, Act) cycle were used.   Clinical network meetings were facilitated by staff from NHSI specialising in the maternity pathway. The clinical group also provided invaluable peer support for each other, sharing tested methodologies in the process.  

Geography

All acute trusts in the South East Coast area (Kent, Surrey and Sussex) were involved.

 

Timescale

The project ran from April 2010 until March 2012, when funding came to an end.  Information is still added to the programme’s database however, and this continues to be analysed.  

Contact details and further information

Normalising Birth was led by Tony Kelly tony.kelly@bsuh.nhs.uk

[post_title] => Normalising Birth programme [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => normalising-birth-programme [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-01-16 16:53:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-01-16 16:53:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://clients.electricstudio.co.uk/tvhiec/wpcms/?post_type=improvement-science&p=3412 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => improvement-science [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3407 [post_author] => 8 [post_date] => 2013-01-16 15:09:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-16 15:09:54 [post_content] =>

The journey -

This programme aimed to improve quality, reduce spend and increase efficiency inmusculoskeletal (MSK) services in East Sussex. Data on efficiency and spend in MSK services were presented to 70 participants at an event called Shaping the Future, where a number of key issues and possible solutions were identified.  These included high rates of fractures and falls admissions, high rates of arthroscopy and of elective admissions, fragmented MSK services and variation in referral rates. The programme has since focussed on pursuing solutions to these issues, including peer-review by GPs of referrals, agreeing surgical policies for arthroscopy and eight further orthopaedic procedures and introducing physiotherapy triage as an alternative to orthopaedic referral.  In order to achieve change in systems and results, it has been necessary to influence culture and behaviour and seek consensus across a number of systems. Alongside this, an integrated MSK service has been procured in Hastings and Rother and commissioning of a similar service is being considered for the remainder of East Sussex in conjunction with other local commissioners.  

Outcomes

Savings achieved in arthroscopy totalled £1.8million in 2010/11 and a further £600K in 2011/12 Interim outcomes for physiotherapy triage are encouraging, and there is increased interest in MSK from a primary care perspective.  A service specification and business case has been agreed for a Falls and Fracture Liaison service for East Sussex and work is underway to implement Shared Decision Making – critical to ensuring that patients are fully aware and have the option to participate in decisions about their care, particularly where more than one treatment option may be available.  

Patient setting

In-patient  X Out-patient   X Community based   X
Mental health Chronic illness   X Cross-systems   X
 

Clinical area

Staying healthy Maternity and newborn Children and young people Acute care
Planned care  X Mental health Long-term conditions   X End of life
 

Information, tools and techniques used

The programme has used a range of national and regional best practice tweaked for local use. For example, the Framework for Musculoskeletal Services, National Institute of Clinical Excellence, surgical policies from other PCT areas, data from the NHS Atlas of Variation and the South East Public Health observatory.  

Geography

The programme covers East Sussex, including East Sussex Downs and Weald and Hastings and Rother PCTs; in the process of becoming three CCGs in Hastings and Rother; Eastbourne, Hailsham and Seaford; High Weald Lewes and Havens. Partners involved in the work include East Susses Healthcare Trust, The Horder Centre (a private orthopaedic service), Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals and a range of independent physiotherapy, MSK and orthopaedic outpatient services.  

Timescale

The programme started in 2010 and is still ongoing.  

Contact details and further information

Fiona Streeter, Service Development Team Leader, East Sussex: fiona.streeter@nhs.net

[post_title] => Reducing spend and increasing efficiency in MSK services [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => reducing-spend-and-increasing-efficiency-in-msk-services [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2013-01-16 15:09:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2013-01-16 15:09:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://clients.electricstudio.co.uk/tvhiec/wpcms/?post_type=improvement-science&p=3407 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => improvement-science [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 5 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3434 [post_author] => 8 [post_date] => 2013-01-16 16:51:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-16 16:51:31 [post_content] =>

The journey -

The project aimed to reduce inpatient falls across eight elderly care and acute medical wards. Nationally over 200,000 falls are reported each year in the NHS and are a major issue in a range of health and social care settings, both NHS and non-NHS. The initiative has focussed on what happens to patients for the first few days in hospital. With an increasing national focus on dementia and frailty the team believes that reducing falls will become a major challenge in delivering compassionate care.  The cost of failing to address the issue in terms of cost and reputation is an additional driver.

 

Outcomes

In the eight wards covered by the initial phase, falls were reduced by 32{79f878acaa41f375dcd804cc8c058b5459a5482f20a3b9f87269b26c8734749b} in twelve months.  Following this success a trust-wide initiative replicated the activity, achieving a reduction across the trust of 17{79f878acaa41f375dcd804cc8c058b5459a5482f20a3b9f87269b26c8734749b}. The original eight wards, with minimal additional input, are still improving at a faster rate than the rest of the trust and have reduced their rate by a further 31{79f878acaa41f375dcd804cc8c058b5459a5482f20a3b9f87269b26c8734749b}.  These results indicate that a focus on the behaviour and habits of individual practitioners is the way to make change sustainable and continuous. In 2012 the trust was shortlisted for the BMJ Safety /Improvement Award.  

Patient setting

In-patient   X Out-patient Community based
Mental health Chronic illness Cross-systems
 

Clinical area

Staying healthy Maternity and newborn Children and young people Acute care   X
Planned care Mental health Long-term conditions End of life
 

Information, tools and techniques used

The first phase, which took a conventional approach to service improvement (training, action plans, guidelines, meetings etc) was abandoned after 9 months as no improvements had been made.  Phase 2 focussed on the concepts of emergent design, followership and imitation, producing outstanding results. Over the past 3 years the team has moved from a position of thinking that safety is a product of resilient processes to thinking that safety is something that emerges out of imitating safe behaviours.  

Geography

Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust.  

Timescale

Phase 1 started in June 2009 and the project is still ongoing.  

Contact details and further information

Mark Renshaw, Deputy Chief of Safety, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust: Mark.Renshaw@bsuh.nhs.uk

Paula Tucker, Head of Nursing Patient Safety, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust: Paula.tucker@bsuh.nhs.uk

[post_title] => Reducing falls in elderly care and across the hospital [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => reducing-falls-in-elderly-care-and-across-the-hospital [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-03-24 13:27:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-03-24 13:27:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://clients.electricstudio.co.uk/tvhiec/wpcms/?post_type=improvement-science&p=3434 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => improvement-science [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 8 [max_num_pages] => 2 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => 1 [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => e1445ab435f5c5bfbdc574010f46e9c9 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) ) [1] => derp )

Category: South East

Reducing falls in elderly care and across the hospital

The journey – The project aimed to reduce inpatient falls across eight elderly care and acute medical wards. Nationally over 200,000 falls are reported each year in the NHS and are a major issue in a range of health and social care settings, both NHS and non-NHS. The initiative has focussed on what happens to […]

Posted on Jan 16th Cat: , , Tags: Comments: Comments are off for this post

Emergency Care Quality Improvement Programme

The journey – The purpose of the programme is to improve patient flows, making emergency pathways more efficient and reducing length of stay and number of beds whilst also making care safe, effective and a good experience for patients and staff. By better matching capacity to demand the trust aimed to make sure that patients […]

Posted on Jan 16th Cat: , , , Tags: Comments: Comments are off for this post

Safe, Supportive and Therapeutic Care

The journey – Safe, Supportive and Therapeutic Care aimed to improve safety and care within acute inpatient mental health units; to minimise risk while maximising therapeutic benefit. A secondary but related objective was to reduce length of stay in acute inpatient units. Strands of work covered three key areas: clinical skills and interventions; policies, procedures […]

Posted on Jan 16th Cat: , , , Comments: Comments are off for this post

Normalising Birth programme

The journey – The aim of the Normalising Birth programme was to address the clinical variation in deliveries across the 11 acute trusts in the South East Coast region. It was important in the early stages to develop a clear understanding of why the variation in birth intervention (primarily Caesarean sections) existed, and to identify […]

Posted on Jan 16th Cat: , , , Tags: Comments: Comments are off for this post

Reducing spend and increasing efficiency in MSK services

The journey – This programme aimed to improve quality, reduce spend and increase efficiency inmusculoskeletal (MSK) services in East Sussex. Data on efficiency and spend in MSK services were presented to 70 participants at an event called Shaping the Future, where a number of key issues and possible solutions were identified.  These included high rates […]

Posted on Jan 16th Cat: , , , , , , , Comments: Comments are off for this post